Downsview Community Primary School

Learning and Achieving Together

OfSTED

Thank you for taking the time to come to this page and find out more about our school.

I have included the main body of the report below and also a link to the full report.

I am very proud to be the head teacher of Downsview Community Primary School. I am proud of the community that we serve, our hard-working and nurturing staff team and of the children who attend each day. As a school we are committed to rapidly turning around our current rating. To do this we will work alongside the local authority, our governing board and parents and carers as we continue to build on the strong foundations that we have set.

Richard Moore - Head Teacher

Information about this inpection

The inspectors carried out this graded inspection under section 5 of the Education Act 2005.

  • This was the first routine inspection the school received since the COVID-19 pandemic began. Inspectors discussed the impact of the pandemic with leaders and have taken that into account in their evaluation of the school.
  • The inspection team held meetings with the headteacher, senior leaders, teachers and pupils. The lead inspector met with the members of the governing body, including the chair of governors. The lead inspector also held a telephone conversation with a representative from the local authority.
  • The inspection team carried out deep dives in these subjects: early reading, mathematics, geography and physical education. For each deep dive, inspectors discussed the curriculum with subject leaders, visited a sample of lessons, spoke to teachers, spoke to some pupils about their learning and looked at samples of pupils’ work. The lead inspector listened to some pupils read to adults they knew.
  • To inspect safeguarding, inspectors held meetings with safeguarding leaders, the governing body, teachers and pupils. They scrutinised the single central record and checked safeguarding records.
  • The inspection team took account of a range of other information, including the school’s development plans, school policies and governor minutes. They also considered external reports of the school from the local authority.
  • The team spoke with pupils about their experience of the school. They took account of parent and carer and staff views through conversations and responses to Ofsted’s surveys

OfSTED Report

What is it like to attend this school?

Downsview Community Primary is a nurturing and supportive school. Staff know their pupils well, and there are positive relationships evident across the school. Pupils are proud to attend this school and of the inclusive nature of their community. For example, they talk positively about the Diwali and Holi celebrations they have held.

Pupils behave well and are keen to live up to the increased expectations throughout the school. Behaviour in lessons is mostly calm and focused. Bullying now happens very rarely. If it were to take place, pupils are confident that staff would deal with it swiftly.

Pupils have a good range of opportunities beyond the academic curriculum. As well as a range of clubs, including cooking, football and beading, they also have opportunities to develop leadership skills. Pupils have a voice in this school, through the eco, school and sports councils. Pupils talk positively about these roles and aspire to take them on.

Pupils benefit from the actions leaders have taken to improve the quality of education following disappointing outcomes from the end of key stage assessments in 2022. However, this work is not yet embedded across the school.

What does the school do well and what does it need to do better?

Leaders have high ambitions for all pupils, including those with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND). They have planned an appropriate curriculum that is well considered and maps what pupils need to know from Year 1 upwards. However, the planning in the early years is not as clearly connected.

In some subjects, planning carefully sequences both the knowledge and skills that pupils need to succeed. However, in some foundation subjects, this is not yet as well balanced. As a result, sometimes activity choices are not always as clearly linked to the intended learning. Where practice is strongest, pupils benefit from clear explanations from teachers. Here, pupils can link their new knowledge to what they learned previously. However, this is not the case across all subjects. Previously, pupils’ attainment in national curriculum tests has been low. While current pupils are making better progress through some areas of this strengthened curriculum, this is not consistently the case across the school.

In mathematics and early reading, teachers have established systems to assess what pupils know and can remember during their lessons. This allows teachers to adapt what they teach to inform pupils’ next steps, ensuring that any misunderstandings are resolved quickly. However, this is not the case in other subjects, and leaders have not yet embedded a system to check what pupils can remember over time.

Leaders increasingly promote a love of reading throughout the school, including the improved library space, classroom displays and reading corners in each classroom. Early reading is generally taught effectively. Children now benefit from targeted and specific sessions to support their particular needs, helping them to develop the skills they need to become increasingly fluent and confident readers. However, this practice is still relatively new and not yet having the full impact that leaders intend.

Leaders have not ensured that all staff have a consistently secure knowledge of how to meet the additional needs of pupils with SEND. Leaders make timely referrals for external support. However, in lessons, the support is more varied. Leaders have not equipped teachers well enough to ensure that there are routinely strong adaptations to learning so that all pupils can access their learning effectively. As a result, not all pupils learn as well as they should.

In the early years, like elsewhere in the school, there are warm and positive relationships between staff and children. However, children have not been sufficiently well prepared for their next steps. While children are engaged and interested in a range of different activities, leaders have not considered carefully enough the intended learning that sits behind the activity choices. Similarly, while leaders acknowledge that communication is an essential area of development for children in the early years, staff do not fully exploit opportunities to model and encourage pupil talk.

While attendance for many pupils is generally strong, there are a minority of pupils who do not attend school regularly enough. Leaders’ actions to address this are beginning to show some impact, but this work continues.

Senior leaders know their school well and carefully identify the actions they need to take to develop it. They work effectively with governors and school improvement partners from the local authority to evaluate the impact of their actions. This helps them to know that their actions are having the impact they want them to. However, they recognise that there is still more work to do.

Safeguarding

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.

There is an effective culture of safeguarding at the school. Staff receive appropriate training which is regularly updated, meaning that they know how to identify and refer any pupils who might be at risk. They know their pupils well, and there are detailed records kept of any concerns. Concerns are acted on quickly, and leaders liaise well with external agencies as needed.

Pupils learn about how to keep themselves safe, including when online, through the curriculum. Leaders complete appropriate checks to ensure that adults are safe to work with children. Governors know their safeguarding responsibilities and hold leaders to account.

  • In the early years, there is not always a clearly considered plan for the activities that pupils undertake in order to develop their learning and specifically language acquisition. Consequently, there are missed opportunities to develop pupils’ communication skills. Leaders need to ensure that all staff have the knowledge required to fully develop children’s communication and language.
  • There is not a clear or systematic approach to assessment in the recently developed foundation curriculum. This means that teachers and leaders do not have an accurate understanding of how much knowledge and skills pupils have understood or retained. Leaders need to ensure that staff are secure in their knowledge of how to assess effectively so that in the way that is the case for maths and early reading, teachers can gauge what pupils have understood and adapt their teaching as necessary.
  • Teaching in lessons is not consistently adapted to meet the needs of pupils with SEND. As a result, pupils do not make the progress that they should through the planned curriculum. Leaders need to ensure all teachers have the knowledge to make required adaptations to learning activities for pupils with SEND.

OfSTED said (Attendance)

"Attendance in school is not high enough. As a result, too many pupils, particularly those who are persistently absent, are missing out on the learning that the school provides. Leaders need to continue to identify the barriers to good attendance and work with families to ensure that attendance increases."

What we are already doing

OfSTED recognised that the actions we have taken to improve attendance are showing positive results but this needs to go further.

We work closely with the South Eastern Attendance Advisory Service (SEAAS) to identify and support pupils with poor attendance. We are open to dialogue and meet regularly to identify barriers to good attendance for pupils causing concern.

Some of what we propose to do

Work with parents and carers to develop a greater understanding of what ‘good’ attendance is and why it is crucial to a child’s development.

Provide a greater clarity on our expectations regarding attendance and procedures for seeking time away from school during term time through our updated attendance policy

Provide regular, meaningful and inclusive rewards and incentives for pupils and families with consistently good attendance.

OfSTED said (EYFS Provision)

"In the early years, there is not always a clearly considered plan for the activities that pupils undertake in order to develop their learning and specifically language acquisition. Consequently, there are missed opportunities to develop pupils’ communication skills. Leaders need to ensure that all staff have the knowledge required to fully develop children’s communication and language."

What we are already doing

OfSTED recognised that we provide an EYFS environment that promotes ‘warm and positive relationships between staff and children. We plan and deliver learning opportunities that engage and interest the children.

Some of what we propose to do

We aim to arrange visits to observe best practice and develop partnership with good and outstanding school. Enhanced professional development opportunities will be provided for staff in our EYFS. We will continue to develop our indoor and outdoor areas to ensure that the children benefit from a language rich environment.

OfSTED said (Curriculum Assessment)

"There is not a clear or systematic approach to assessment in the recently developed foundation curriculum. This means that teachers and leaders do not have an accurate understanding of how much knowledge and skills pupils have understood or retained. Leaders need to ensure that staff are secure in their knowledge of how to assess effectively so that in the way that is the case for maths and early reading, teachers can gauge what pupils have understood and adapt their teaching as necessary."

What we are already doing

We have worked hard over the past 18 months to ensure that children benefit from a structed and coherent curriculum in all subjects. This curriculum will enable children to build upon, and make links between, their learning whilst meeting the requirements of the national curriculum in an engaging way.

Some of what we propose to do

Proposed changes to the staffing structure will enable senior leaders to provide more support to subject leaders to develop assessment strategies to mirror those in place in the core subjects. Our assessment policy will be further developed to include assessment for the wider curriculum. We are exploring the benefits of using an online tool, such as Tapestry, to record and learning that is not recorded in pupil books.

OfSTED said (SEND Provision)

"Teaching in lessons is not consistently adapted to meet the needs of pupils with SEND. As a result, pupils do not make the progress that they should through the planned curriculum. Leaders need to ensure all teachers have the knowledge to make required adaptations to learning activities for pupils with SEND."

What we are already doing

OfSTED recognised that the school hold high expectations for pupils with SEND and that we work with outside agencies effectively to provide support for pupils with additional needs. Teachers plan and review provision maps termly in order to ensure that pupils benefit from intervention and support and that learning is adapted to be accessible for all pupils.

Some of what we propose to do

Proposed changes to the staffing structure will enable senior leaders to provide more support to teachers to ensure consistency in provision for pupils with SEND. Curriculum planning documents will be further developed to promote inclusivity and accessibility for all. Senior leader will develop partnerships with good and outstanding school to ensure thebest outcomes for pupils with SEND at Downsview.


OfSTED Report - April 2023

OfSTED Report - January 2020

 

Headteacher Presentation to Parents - June 2023